News

Meet Frances Gillum, mother of AFSCME Florida's endorsed candidate for Governor of Florida, Andrew Gillum, and card carrying member of AFSCME Retirees of Florida.

The best spokespeople for anyone running for elected office are everyday Americans spreading the word to their neighbors, co-workers, friends and relatives.

AFSCME Florida Members Come Together for Hurricane Recovery

One had only been an AFSCME member for a month, another for about a year. A third had a year-and-a-half of public service under his belt. But all three members had one thing in common: a determination to join together to have the strongest possible voice for themselves and their co-workers in the workplace.

The way they're doing that is through AFSCME Strong, our union’s program to communicate, one-on-one, with fellow workers to highlight the importance of sticking together to make our voices heard.

Tallahassee, FL – AFSCME Florida released the following statement from executive director Andy Madtes on the lack of a pay raise for state employees in this state legislative session:

A new report released this week by the Department of Management Service, State Personnel System Annual Workforce Report for Fiscal Year 2014-15, puts into black and white what the failure to invest in state workers, and the services they provide, really looks like.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Nearly two dozen AFSCME Retirees were among more than 200 people who showed up on a recent crisp February winter morning to help open the Hillary for America campaign office just a short walk from the state capitol.

James McGee has always been happy to pay his AFSCME dues because, much like participating in the electoral process, “if you are not participating then you are letting others control your future.” Late last year, McGee learned more about the value of his union when he turned to AFSCME Local 3030 to actually fight for his job.

The following op-ed ran in the January 20 Sun Sentinel

Florida is a large and diverse state. In the time and distance it takes to drive from Pensacola to Key West, you could drive from Madison, Wisc., to Washington, D.C. During those more than twelve hours of non-stop driving, more than 400 more people would have moved into the country's third most populated state.