News

Retiree leaders from across the country attended the AFSCME Retirees Council meeting that was held on Sunday and Monday, ushering in exciting new changes while fortifying members

The Janus case was an attempt to deliver a knockout blow to millions of working people and their families who looked to the Supreme Court as an independent institution that advances equal

The following story appeared on the Florida Bulldog site and can be found clicking here.

Florida’s coming war on collective bargaining for state employees

When Miami state Rep. Carlos Trujillo was interviewed on Spanish language radio station Actualidad 1020 he boldly proclaimed that Republicans will ask voters in 2018 to eliminate collective bargaining for state employees from the Florida Constitution.

Florida is negotiating a contract on working conditions for the nearly 14,000 members of AFSCME Florida employed by the state. While number of paid union members is small, the collective bargaining agreement will apply to all 98,000 members of the State Personnel System since Florida is a right-to-work state. The agreement expires June 30.

Contract negotiations are proceeding against the backdrop of Gov. Rick Scott’s proposed budget, which balances a $1 billion tax cut with no pay raises for the state workforce and elimination of 1,386 positions and a net reduction of 864 jobs.

Too often the dangers of outsourcing hit us when the proverbial train has already left the station, making the pushback efforts that much harder. So there’s a good feeling when you can get ahead of the curve.

This week in Florida, the men and women of the Miami-Dade County Water and Sewer Department, proud members of AFSCME Local 121, strongly pushed back against even the idea of outsourcing a new water treatment plant that hasn’t even been built yet.

The city of DeFuniak Springs lies just north of Interstate 10 in a part of the Florida panhandle that is physically closer to Alabama than the Gulf Coast. And for the members of AFSCME Local 3918, the opinions about unions held by the community, city leaders and even many of their coworkers reflect this as well.

The bus drivers, maintenance and food service workers – and all the other hard-working men and women of AFSMCE Florida Local 1184 who make the country’s fourth-largest school system happen every day – have approved a new three-year contract with the Miami-Dade Public School system.

Every day, Lawrence Jones likes to talk to at least one of his coworkers in Miami-Dade County about the importance of joining the union.

Hundreds of hardworking men and women of AFSCME Local 2227 recently ratified three new contracts, providing not only a boost to members’ paychecks but also serving to protect public service jobs in the future.

The members, who proudly make Florida’s Polk County Public Schools happen, united to pass strong contracts for bus drivers and bus attendants, food service staff and for maintenance, custodial and vehicle services employees.