News

What is the feeling you get when you show up to work one day and you are called into an unscheduled meeting in the conference room? You walk in and see management sitting across the table with expressions that indicate this meeting is not going to go well.

It is a feeling of fear for what’s about to come next, a feeling that you may have to be fighting back against something you don’t fully understand.

For the hardworking members of AFSCME Locals 1328 and 1781, it was not a question of how they were going to vote on their new contract but when they could do so. The two north Florida locals, which represent 2,400 clerks, LPNs, maintenance, PCAs and other professional and critical staff at UF Health Jacksonville, overwhelmingly approved a new three-year contract.

When the two days of voting concluded, more than half the units had voted, and not a single no vote was cast.

In a move designed to both better reflect the breadth and depth of workers represented across the state and to better the position the union for future growth, Florida leaders of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) voted to rename their state council.

AFSCME Florida Statement on Profile Story on State Worker Layoffs

Miami Springs – AFSCME Florida released the following statement following the Tallahassee Democrat’s story on state

worker layoffs:

What would you do for $12,800? How hard would you work for it? What would it mean if you had it taken away from you?

These are all questions that Deloris Wells had to answer during the last four years because her supervisor was not completing the annual evaluation form. And without a completed form she didn’t get a wage increase, year after year.

But, as this 12-year employee of Miami-Dade County said, “I knew this wasn’t right because my job involves dealing with payroll benefits so I knew there had to be something I could do.”

NORTH MIAMI BEACH, Fla. – More than 200 union members stood united with small business owners and community activists in front of city hall here Aug. 4, protesting the council’s recent decision to move forward with consideration of outsourcing the city’s sanitation services.

AFSCME Florida is experiencing drastic change, and I’m excited about the opportunity we have to create a vital new movement here in the Sunshine State.

After a long and distinguished career fighting for Florida’s workers, including almost two decades leading AFSCME Council 79, President Jeanette Wynn retired. Now it’s up to us to continue the fight, and I believe we have the vision and the will to build a stronger, more powerful AFSCME throughout Florida.