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During the mad dash that can be found during the last week of classes before the winter holiday break, AFSCME Local 1184 members had their own end-of-year sprint.

The members, who work for the Miami-Dade County Public Schools, turned a tentative agreement on wages and benefits into a ratification vote at 10 sites across the county in just six days. Members voted 97.6% in favor of the contract.

“We have had a great year of growth and success and this new agreement proves how the hard work really pays off,” said school bus driver and Local 1184 President Vicki Hall.

Tallahassee, FL — Today, Gov. Rick Scott issued an executive order regarding policies and training around sexual harassment in the workplace. AFSCME Florida Executive Director Andy Madtes released the following statement:

After almost three years of pushing to enforce her contract and get a paycheck that reflects the work she does, Joyce Harris is $8,805 closer to victory.

Harris loves working for Florida A&M University because she believes in the historically black university’s mission of providing access to a high-quality, affordable education to students who otherwise may never have the opportunity to fulfill their dreams of getting a college degree.

Tallulah Thomas a Behavioral Program Specialist with the Developmental Disabilities Defendant Program at Florida State Hospital in Chattahoochee released the following statement on behalf of her union, AFSCME Florida, following the passage of HB25:

“As a dedicated state employee, this bill is an attack on me personally and on the freedom and rights of all of my coworkers. House Bill 25 would silence us by taking away our voice through collective bargaining and would strip our right to choose if we want to be in a union or not.

AFSCME Florida released the following statement on today’s story by the Associated Press on Florida’s settling of sexual harassment claims involving state workers:   

Throughout the year, AFSCME locals across Florida have made volunteering one of the key union-wide goals to help build connections with the same people we serve every day working in the Sunshine State.

It would be easy to suspect that a smaller local in a right to work state would have a tough time winning a great contract. Don’t tell that to the members of AFSCME Local 871 who have 196 members out of a bargaining unit of 226.

The City of Miami recently approved a new contract that will deliver annual wage and step increases that will raise employee pay by 20% over the next three years.

In state capitols and all the way to the Supreme Court, wealthy and powerful interests want to silence our voice and take away our freedoms. To fight back, we must lead with our values. We must stand up to say proudly who AFSCME is and what we stand for.