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Earlier this summer, Economic Self-Sufficiency Specialists within the Department of Children and Families worked with AFSCME Florida staff representatives to challenge a policy that limited how the

No politician running for office today would openly advocate for more wealth inequality in our country, where the richest 1 percent of the population owns 40 percent of the wealth. Even candidate Donald Trump in 2016 promised to stand up for the “forgotten men and women of our country,” who feel betrayed by a rigged economic system that benefits a small minority at their expense. Yet every single day, President Trump and congressional leaders seem determined to do more to increase wealth inequality than to alleviate it; do more for corporations and the wealthy than for single parents working two or three jobs to make ends meet.

In an article for Florida Politics, Michael Moline details the latest report on the health of the state's retirement system after a meeting of the Florida Investment Advisory Council.

"Assets have grown by 10.5 percent since the start of the fiscal year, reaching a balance of $163.3 billion — $9.8 billion ahead of last year."

When he first took a job at the Centralia Correctional Center in Illinois, Keith Kracht knew that a career in public service wouldn’t make him a millionaire. But then again, that’s not why he went into public service.

AFSCME President Lee Saunders lashed out at the Trump administration after President Donald Trump signed a series of executive orders to make it easier to fire federal workers and weaken their unions.

Don't fall for the scam.

Since the 1880s, dedicated municipal employees had operated Jacksonville’s water and sewer systems. Expanded to include an electric system in 1895, the arrangement is even part of the city’s charter. In 1968, Jacksonville Electric Authority became JEA as it grew into an independent, but publicly run, authority as it included customers in surrounding counties.

When AFSCME members stand together, we have power in numbers. Together, we can defend our freedom to take our loved ones to the doctor when they get sick and retire with dignity some day. Together, we have the power to make our voices heard at work and in our democracy. That’s our AFSCME Agenda.

AFSCME women represent more than half of our union’s membership. Women are leading the charge to create change for working families. Given the challenges facing our union and the pending U.S. Supreme Court decision in Janus v. AFSCME, it is imperative for AFSCME women to be prepared to lead.