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Earlier this summer, Economic Self-Sufficiency Specialists within the Department of Children and Families worked with AFSCME Florida staff representatives to challenge a policy that limited how the

No politician running for office today would openly advocate for more wealth inequality in our country, where the richest 1 percent of the population owns 40 percent of the wealth. Even candidate Donald Trump in 2016 promised to stand up for the “forgotten men and women of our country,” who feel betrayed by a rigged economic system that benefits a small minority at their expense. Yet every single day, President Trump and congressional leaders seem determined to do more to increase wealth inequality than to alleviate it; do more for corporations and the wealthy than for single parents working two or three jobs to make ends meet.

Miami-Dade County is known for a lot of great things, but shared economic prosperity has not been one of those for the past few years. In fact, Bloomberg recently ranked Miami as the most economically unequal city in America. In fact, in just one year income disparity grew a mind-boggling 16.8 percent.

The leadership of AFSCME Local 2227 knew they had to think outside the box when it came to strengthening their voice at the bargaining table. Going into contract negotiations with Polk County School Board, they figured the best way to do that was to grow the local, easier said than done in a large district in a Right to Work For Less state like Florida.

Miami-Dade County’s Jackson Health System doesn’t run itself. It takes the dedication and commitment of the thousands of men and women who deliver all patients a high standard of care and service regardless of their ability to pay. It is the mission of AFSCME Local 1363 to ensure the staff who keep the system running receive the dignity, support and benefits they deserve.

Last year, the members of AFSCME Local 199 wanted to show that their commitment to a stronger Miami-Dade County didn’t stop when the work day ended. That is why they made giving back through community service and charitable contributions a topic of focus at every membership meeting.

AFSCME Florida released the following statement following comments from state legislators on the budget impact of investing in the state’s workforce:

"For more than eight years, Florida's dedicated state workers have sacrificed, done more with less and put the needs of the state ahead a pay raise. Every year, we are told that there is enough money to spend on giveaways to big businesses and enough pork to grease the wheels for reelection back home. But when it comes to helping state workers putting food on the table there is suddenly a budget crisis that prevents it.

Andy Madtes, President of the South Florida AFL-CIO, blasted Donald Trump on Friday for the "irony" of visiting Miami on National Citizenship Day and Constitution Day.

"The Constitution, written by immigrants, outlines the guiding principles of what makes America great — our diversity,” Madtes said in a statement. “Donald Trump claims to defend the Constitution, but his hateful rhetoric shreds everything it stands for. Trump doesn’t want an America by 'the People' unless those people are rich, racist, xenophobic and misogynistic just like him."

State workers feel short-changed on hurricane days

 James Call, Democrat Capitol Reporter 8:02 a.m. EDT September 14, 2016

  

http://www.miamiherald.com/opinion/op-ed/article99669287.html

Hardworking Floridians put in the time every day to take care of our families. We work to put food on the table, to put ourselves through school, to pay for the piano lessons and the baseball league. Our hard work allows our economy to thrive and our work is what makes America great.