Earlier this week, the NBA’s Miami Heat held their Ninth Annual Black History Month Challenge at the AmericanAirlines Arena.


This year’s Atlantic hurricane season may not be over yet (it ends Nov. 30), but its history is already being written. As The Washington Post pointed out in a recent article, “The extreme ferocity of the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season will be talked about for decades.”

Welcome from AFSCME Florida Executive Director Andy Madtes

Our state, and our union, was put to the test over these past few months. Between prepping for the storm, dealing with evacuations and, now, the rebuilding process, there is not a single part of the state that was spared from Hurricane Irma’s impact.

When the City of Hallandale Beach passed a budget late last month it was a long time coming. And while the headlines focused on the sausage-making process that the city commission took to finally get to that point, and the intense nature that have become common for this South Florida community, it also represented a huge victory for the city employees of AFSCME Local 2009.

Over the past few years, the City of Daytona Beach has seen rapid growth when it comes to residents, businesses and visitors to the capital of Florida’s “surf coast.” That growth is was made possible in part by the hardworking city employees who are members of AFSCME Local 2066. And in their new two-year contract, members made sure they get to share in some of the prosperity they have created.

Facing long odds going into Election Day, AFSCME members helped to pull off an unexpected 1,664 vote victory in a Florida state senate special election on behalf of a strong support of labor.

The U.S. Supreme Court today accepted a case called Janus v. AFSCME Council 31, which would make the entire public sector “right-to-work” in one fell swoop.

Janus – which the nation’s highest court will take up in the October 2017-June 2018 term – is a blatantly political and well-funded plot to use the highest court in the land to further rig the economic rules against everyday working people.

Across this state, public employees worked countless hours preparing their towns, schools and communities for Hurricane Irma. We worked double shifts in hospitals, slept in conference rooms or at desks and we never quit on our neighbors.  We hope you and your family are safe but many of us are in need of assistance, big and small. This sheet contains some information that may help. In no way is this a complete list but hopefully at least a starting point as we rebuild our state. Please know that your union is standing here with you because, like you, we never quit.

It is often said that a tragedy can bring families closer. For far too many Floridians, including many AFSCME members, Hurricane Irma has resulted in a rebuilding effort that will take weeks, even months, to put their lives back together.

For Stephanie Rohling, a Department of Transportation weight inspector and member of AFSCME Local 3104 in Punta Gorda, it has resulted in the loss of her family’s house. But it has also resulted in her becoming closer to her AFSCME family.