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Earlier this summer, Economic Self-Sufficiency Specialists within the Department of Children and Families worked with AFSCME Florida staff representatives to challenge a policy that limited how the

No politician running for office today would openly advocate for more wealth inequality in our country, where the richest 1 percent of the population owns 40 percent of the wealth. Even candidate Donald Trump in 2016 promised to stand up for the “forgotten men and women of our country,” who feel betrayed by a rigged economic system that benefits a small minority at their expense. Yet every single day, President Trump and congressional leaders seem determined to do more to increase wealth inequality than to alleviate it; do more for corporations and the wealthy than for single parents working two or three jobs to make ends meet.

AFSCME Florida executive director Andy Madtes released the following statement on today’s announced state budget agreement:

“For too long the men and women who have made Florida one of the premier places to raise a family, grow a business or enjoy retirement have done so without their hard work being justly compensated. No longer.

Christopher Cummings’ life is a study in contrasts.

Where he was once homeless and alone, he is now a husband and father of four. Where he once ate out of a garbage can, he is now a proud public service worker who drives a garbage truck for Miami-Dade County, Florida. Where he once “ran around doing wrong,” he now serves his community on those very same streets and neighborhoods, helping make his community a better, cleaner place every day.

Photos from this special event can be seen by clicking here.

This April marked the 49th anniversary of the death of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. while he was in Memphis supporting an AFSCME sanitation workers strike. Dr. King went to Memphis in 1968 to call attention to the plight of these workers, who were striking for better wages and working conditions, and recognition of their union.

With Florida’s 2017 legislative session passing the halfway mark, many critical issues facing AFSCME members remain in flux. While the attacks to retirement security, health care and even the very right to a democratic voice on the job continue, the weeks of incredible outreach over the phones, in person and at events around the state by AFSCME members and allies have had a real impact.

The following column ran on the site Florida Politics

Recently the House passed HB11, legislation that would require labor unions representing public sector workers to certify they have more than half of the workers signed up as members every single year. In their view this will empower workers to somehow bargain better contracts and benefits and, they swear, in no way an attempt to strip workers of their right to a voice on the job.

http://www.tampabay.com/opinion/letters/thursdays-letters-gorsuch-puts-b...

I write to express my concerns about Neil Gorsuch, President Donald Trump's nominee to the Supreme Court. One Another way to describe him would be as Wall Street's best friend, as Gorsuch has consistently favored the wealthy and powerful at the expense of everyone else.

Over two days in early March, AFSCME Local 1279 brought to a vote a new multi-year contract with their employer, the city of Jacksonville, Florida. For years, too many years, the city’s budget had been balanced on the backs of working families. Though their commitment to serving their communities never wavered, it was tough to keep up with the rising cost of living when their pay never moved for almost eight years. And the strength of the Local suffered along with the members.

For Tarcara Lamkin, being a state employee means she knows that she is serving her community every day. As a senior clerk with the Florida Department of Health at the Magnolia Women's Health Center, she knows she is an integral part to ensuring that the Jacksonville community is informed and able to take action concerning sexually transmitted diseases.