News

Earlier this summer, Economic Self-Sufficiency Specialists within the Department of Children and Families worked with AFSCME Florida staff representatives to challenge a policy that limited how the

No politician running for office today would openly advocate for more wealth inequality in our country, where the richest 1 percent of the population owns 40 percent of the wealth. Even candidate Donald Trump in 2016 promised to stand up for the “forgotten men and women of our country,” who feel betrayed by a rigged economic system that benefits a small minority at their expense. Yet every single day, President Trump and congressional leaders seem determined to do more to increase wealth inequality than to alleviate it; do more for corporations and the wealthy than for single parents working two or three jobs to make ends meet.

Just a few minutes’ drive from the banks of Florida’s Lake Okeechobee, Indiantown was founded as a trading post by members of the Seminole tribe living in the surrounding Everglades following the Third Seminole War.

While the railroad and horse racing changed the community when it was incorporated into the new Martin County in the 1920s, Indiantown remains a small town. But it is a small town with a big AFSCME voice.

Gimenez pushes privatization of county’s transit future

By Douglas Hanks

Saying “I don’t want to operate anything,” Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez is touting the benefits of tapping private operators for new transit systems that could include a light-rail system he wants to traverse two bridges between Miami and Miami Beach.

What is the feeling you get when you show up to work one day and you are called into an unscheduled meeting in the conference room? You walk in and see management sitting across the table with expressions that indicate this meeting is not going to go well.

It is a feeling of fear for what’s about to come next, a feeling that you may have to be fighting back against something you don’t fully understand.

For the hardworking members of AFSCME Locals 1328 and 1781, it was not a question of how they were going to vote on their new contract but when they could do so. The two north Florida locals, which represent 2,400 clerks, LPNs, maintenance, PCAs and other professional and critical staff at UF Health Jacksonville, overwhelmingly approved a new three-year contract.

When the two days of voting concluded, more than half the units had voted, and not a single no vote was cast.

In a move designed to both better reflect the breadth and depth of workers represented across the state and to better the position the union for future growth, Florida leaders of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) voted to rename their state council.

AFSCME Florida Statement on Profile Story on State Worker Layoffs

Miami Springs – AFSCME Florida released the following statement following the Tallahassee Democrat’s story on state

worker layoffs:

What would you do for $12,800? How hard would you work for it? What would it mean if you had it taken away from you?

These are all questions that Deloris Wells had to answer during the last four years because her supervisor was not completing the annual evaluation form. And without a completed form she didn’t get a wage increase, year after year.

But, as this 12-year employee of Miami-Dade County said, “I knew this wasn’t right because my job involves dealing with payroll benefits so I knew there had to be something I could do.”