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State management has been showing precious little compassion and care by disregarding public health measures which would safeguard the general public and workers, AFSCME Florida President Vicki Hal

With several hundred new custodians to Miami-Dade County Public Schools participating in training on everything from safety to how to manage their benefits, AFSCME Local 1184 members, along w

A 30 year veteran City of Daytona Beach employee and AFSCME Local 2066 member Ted Wolfe saved a life in early March when he came upon a 57-year-old man unresponsive and slumped over his steering wheel in the middle of a busy intersection. As others panicked and shouted that the driver was dead, Wolfe calmly sprang into action checking his pulse and confirming he was not breathing.

Georgia Veiga has been a proud member of AFSCME New Jersey Local 3440 for the last 17 years. She regularly seeks out opportunities to support companies that employ union workers. 

As the world marked the anniversary of the official start of the coronavirus pandemic Thursday, President Biden signed the American Rescue Plan into law and offered words of hope to a weary nation.

Frontline workers across Florida are under attack. Senate Bill 78 and it's companion in the Florida House, HB 947, are designed to make it more difficult for Florida's public workers to join and remain in their Unions. This is a political Union-busting attack on the very men and women we’ve relied on during the Covid-19 Pandemic: Our essential frontline workers.

AFSCME President Lee Saunders praised the House of Representatives for passing the American Rescue Plan on Saturday and urged the Senate to follow suit as soon as possible.

There is good news for AFSCME members looking to pursue higher education. AFSCME Free College has made its bachelor’s degree completion program a permanent benefit.

That means that AFSCME members and their families can earn a bachelor’s degree for free, making an even wider choice of career options a possibility for more people.

Here’s a sure sign of new leadership in Washington. There’s a renewed push to increase the minimum wage to $15 an hour, an idea that went nowhere when the Trump administration and anti-worker members of Congress were in power.